Frequently Asked Questions

Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Certification and Licensing | Rating:
2.5

State regulations permit teachers to be assigned no more than one period a day outside their certification, license/appointment area. This is called incidental teaching.

Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Certification and Licensing | Rating:
4

The 100 hours every five years is a requirement only for those who hold a Professional or Level III Teaching Assistant Certificate. Most new teachers enter the system with a Transitional B or Initial Certificate and will not be eligible for the Professional Certificate until they have been teaching for three years.

Although school professional development is not CTLE approved, know that DOE is an approved provider. The UFT and UFT Teacher Center are also CTLE providers. For more...

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Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Certification and Licensing | Rating:
4.666665

The requirements for New York State certificates can be found at www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert. There are no separate requirements for a New York City license other than the availability of a vacancy in the certificate area and the recommendation of a principal to hire the person for the vacancy.

Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Certification and Licensing | Rating:
3.6

You must have New York State certification to be hired for a full-time teaching position in New York City. The position must match the state certificate. New York City no longer issues a separate paper license, but there is still a license/appointment process that must take place in the DOE computer system once someone is hired. This determines your tenure track and your seniority for excessing and layoff.

Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Bloodborne Pathogens | Rating:
5

While most New York City school educators are not at risk, if you are exposed to blood or body fluids in an accident, playground scrape, bloody nose, fight, athletic injury or violent incident, treat any such incident as if the fluids are infected because there is no way to tell if a child or adult is infected with Hepatitis B or other bloodborne pathogens.

Wash the affected area with soap and water immediately. Flush eyes and exposed mucous membranes with large amounts of water....

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Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Bloodborne Pathogens | Rating:
5

The DOE is required to develop an Exposure Control Plan that:

  • identifies at-risk workers;
  • outlines methods to prevent or eliminate exposure, including universal precautions and the use of safe needle devices;
  • outlines adequate personal protective equipment;
  • establishes a housekeeping, cleaning and disinfection program;
  • establishes a bloodborne pathogens training program;
  • offers Hepatitis B vaccine at no cost; and
  • ...
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Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Bloodborne Pathogens | Rating:
3

By law, employers must take specific measures to prevent or reduce worker exposure to blood and other infectious body fluids in the workplace. It applies to all school employees considered at-risk because their job brings them into routine contact with blood and body fluids that can cause diseases such as HIV/AIDs, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C. That contact may occur while providing first aid or be the result of bites, cuts or openings in the skin, needlesticks, or splashes into the eyes,...

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Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Absences | Rating:
4.7

There is no specific number of absences that would cause a U rating. However the principal does have an obligation to investigate if there is a pattern to your absences such as taking off before and after holidays or on Mondays and Fridays.

Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Absences | Rating:
3.833335

You may take off the day of death and up to three calendar days immediately following the death of an immediate family member and up to one day for the death of a relative outside the immediate family or household. Form OP 201 is required.

Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Absences | Rating:
4.5

Yes. Measles, mumps and chicken pox are childhood diseases that are not deductible from your sick time. Ask your school secretary or UFT chapter leader for an OP 198 application to submit to your principal. Your principal may also excuse additional non-attendance days other than for illness. You must submit an OP 201 application. Most of the permissible non-attendance days are listed on the back of that...

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Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Absences | Rating:
3.785715

Personal days are to be used for business that can be conducted only during the school day on school time. All three of your personal business days may be used to care for a sick family member. Reasonable notice must be given for personal business that is scheduled in advance, such as the closing on a house. However, if you are out to take care of a suddenly ill child, advance notice is not ordinarily required.

Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Absences | Rating:
3.875

Teachers have up to 10 self-treated days per school year without a doctor’s note for absences due to illness. Three out of the 10 may be used for personal business.

Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Class Sizes | Rating:
4.142855

SETSS isn’t a class. It is a support service that may be provided to students with disabilities in the general ed classroom or elsewhere for at least three hours a week and it can include consultation with the child’s teacher. There may not be more than eight students in an instructional group receiving SETSS.

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