News

Labor leaders appeal to members to join June 17 silent march to protest stop-and-frisk

UFT President Michael Mulgrew and his fellow city labor leaders gathered on June 15 to call on New York’s more than 1 million union members to attend a major march against the city’s controversial “stop-and-frisk” policing policy on Sunday, June 17.

Speaking outside the Manhattan Municipal Building just a short walk from One Police Plaza, Mulgrew blasted the biased practice, which he said affects tens of thousands of New York City public school students every year.

“What are we teaching them?” Mulgrew asked. “Are we teaching them to be respectful when they are stopped because of the color of their skin or their gender? We are teaching a very bad lesson to our children.”

Under “stop-and-frisk,” city police officers, under the direction of Mayor Bloomberg, every year stop and question hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers without cause. The mayor and the police commissioner claim that the stops are random and have reduced crime in the city, but critics insist they are discriminatory: Most of those stopped are black or Latino, many of them are young men and 42 percent are minority males between the ages of 14 and 24 — a group that makes up a mere 5 percent of the city’s population.

“We will not be silent until these practices are changed,” Mulgrew said at the press conference, which was convened by New York City Central Labor Council President Vinnie Alvarez. “We stand here as labor to say we are calling for an overhaul of stop-and-frisk.”

The “Silent March against Racial Profiling” will take place at 3 p.m. on June 17, which is Father’s Day. The UFT contingent will be gathering on 110th Street, midway between Fifth and Lenox Avenues, on the park side of the street, at 2 p.m. Look for the UFT banner. Please note: Fifth Avenue will be obstructed, and crossing it will be difficult, so you should plan on reaching the UFT's assembly point from the north or the west side.

Sign up for the march >>

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