News briefs: Thursday, January 17, 2013

  • California denied NCLB waiver January 17, 2013

    California won’t be joining the 33 states that have already received a federal waiver from meeting No Child Left Behind math and English language competency goals. The state will lose funding as a result. The sticking point: the state’s unwillingness to evaluate teachers based in part on how well their students do on standardized tests.

  • California teachers’ pension fund to sell firearm holdings January 17, 2013

    Acting on a request from the state treasurer, the board of the state teachers’ pension fund in California has begun the process of selling its holdings in some gun and ammunition-clip manufacturers. Treasurer Bill Lockyer’s motion was approved unanimously by the Investment Committee of the $154 billion California State Teachers’ Retirement System.

  • Teachers unions blast proposal to arm teachers January 17, 2013

    National Rifle Association leader Wayne LaPierre’s stance that schools are safer when teachers are armed was slammed by the leaders of both national teachers unions as itself dangerous and unsafe. “Guns have no place in our schools. Period,” read a joint statement from the American Federation of Teachers and the National Education Association.

  • Boston mayor seeks curbs on teachers union January 17, 2013

    Boston mayor Thomas M. Menino wants to change state law so school systems can accelerate efforts to overhaul low-achieving schools with what he called “fewer roadblocks from teachers unions.”

  • Philadelphia to close 40 schools January 17, 2013

    Philadelphia schools head William R. Hite Jr. plans to close some 40 schools — one in six of the city’s total — by June, affecting 17,000 students and 1,100 teachers. Hite cited both poor academic records and building deterioration in his decision.

  • State court voids North Carolina paycheck law targeting teachers’ association January 17, 2013

    Philadelphia schools head William R. Hite Jr. plans to close some 40 schools — one in six of the city’s total — by June, affecting 17,000 students and 1,100 teachers. Hite cited both poor academic records and building deterioration in his decision.

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