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UFT African Heritage Committee’s 11th annual awards dinner

Struggle not over
New York Teacher
Miller Photography

The night’s awardees (seated) pose with their awards and with UFT and community leaders, including the NAACP’s Hazel Dukes (standing, third from left). More photos >>

Miller Photography

Chapter leaders and staff from the Federation of Nurses/UFT celebrate with Goldman (back, third from left), who is the head of the federation as well as a UFT vice president. Her son (back, second from left), Jason Goldman, is the union’s deputy director for political action.

More than 270 friends and members of the UFT’s African Heritage Committee kicked off Black History Month with a bang at the committee’s 11th annual dinner dance and awards ceremony on Feb. 7 at a catering hall in Queens. The night’s theme was “Steady the Course,” which committee chair Anthony Harmon, who is also the union’s director of parent and community outreach, said was a reminder that we must keep up the fight for economic and civil rights. “Just because we have an African-American president doesn’t mean the struggle is over,” Harmon said. Awards were given to two outstanding fighters in that struggle for social and economic justice and civil rights. The UFT’s own Anne Goldman received

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the committee’s Trailblazer Award for her work as the union’s first-ever vice president for non-DOE members, while newly elected Queens City Councilman I. Daneek Miller, a past president of Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1056, won this year’s Frederick Douglass Award for his labor and community activism. The committee also honored Frederick Douglass Academy teacher Marquis Harrison, who works part time for the UFT Political Action Department, with its Mary McLeod Bethune Award and gave $1,000 scholarships to two deserving high school students.

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