Frequently Asked Questions

Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Bloodborne Pathogens | Rating:
5

While most New York City school educators are not at risk, if you are exposed to blood or body fluids in an accident, playground scrape, bloody nose, fight, athletic injury or violent incident, treat any such incident as if the fluids are infected because there is no way to tell if a child or adult is infected with Hepatitis B or other bloodborne pathogens.

Wash the affected area with soap and water immediately. Flush eyes and exposed mucous membranes with large amounts of water....

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Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Bloodborne Pathogens | Rating:
5

The DOE is required to develop an Exposure Control Plan that:

  • identifies at-risk workers;
  • outlines methods to prevent or eliminate exposure, including universal precautions and the use of safe needle devices;
  • outlines adequate personal protective equipment;
  • establishes a housekeeping, cleaning and disinfection program;
  • establishes a bloodborne pathogens training program;
  • offers Hepatitis B vaccine at no cost; and
  • ...
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Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Bloodborne Pathogens | Rating:
3

By law, employers must take specific measures to prevent or reduce worker exposure to blood and other infectious body fluids in the workplace. It applies to all school employees considered at-risk because their job brings them into routine contact with blood and body fluids that can cause diseases such as HIV/AIDs, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C. That contact may occur while providing first aid or be the result of bites, cuts or openings in the skin, needlesticks, or splashes into the eyes,...

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