Frequently Asked Questions

Posted Jul 18, 2017 | Category: Environmental Health and Safety | Rating:
0

New state regulations mandating the testing for lead in water in all public New York schools went into effect on Sept. 6, 2016. To comply with these new state laws, the DOE has been testing all water outlets in all New York City schools for lead. Chapter leaders may have already or soon will receive the results from the testing conducted at schools via their principals. As part of this new state regulation, notification letters on the results must be sent to school staff and parents of...

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Posted Aug 11, 2011 | Category: Bed bugs | Rating:
5

Learn to identify the signs of bed bugs (visit the Health Department’s website or call 311 for additional information). Frequently inspect your rooms; if you see signs of bed bugs, report them immediately. If you capture a suspected specimen, submit it to the DOE Pest Management Unit following the procedures outlined in the beginning of this kit. Check your furniture frequently for bed bugs, especially chairs and couches. Get rid...

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Posted Aug 11, 2011 | Category: Bed bugs | Rating:
0

Parents of students in the entire building must be notified if there is an infestation, according to state law. An infestation is identified by bed bug reproduction in a given area. A single confirmed bed bug does not constitute an infestation. A DOE Pest Management professional must inspect the school and determine whether there is an infestation. Schools are not a friendly environment for bed bugs and the chance of an infestation is low. If it is determined that your school is infested,...

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Posted Aug 11, 2011 | Category: Bed bugs | Rating:
0

The DOE Pest Management professional will inspect and, if necessary, treat the room in which the specimen was captured. In most cases, a thorough inspection and vacuuming of the room with a HEPA vacuum by the Pest Management Unit professional is the best treatment when there is not an infestation. If the Pest Management Professional determines that there is an infestation (bed bugs living and reproducing in the room), the rooms above, below and adjacent to the infested room will be inspected...

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Posted Aug 11, 2011 | Category: Bed bugs | Rating:
2.5

No. Bed bugs are not known to cause or transmit disease and the risk of person-to-person transference in school is very low. No child should be isolated or removed from a classroom setting. It is important to remember that bed bugs can resemble other insects and that many bed bugs submitted for identification are not, in fact, bed bugs.

Posted Aug 11, 2011 | Category: Bed bugs | Rating:
0

No. If it is a bed bug, it is likely that it was unknowingly brought into the school by someone who encountered it in another place. If you have captured it, you may have already eliminated the problem. Additionally, many suspected bed bugs are not bed bugs at all. You should send the captured specimen to the DOE Pest Management Unit for identification by following the protocol described in the DOE’s Bed Bug...

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Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Construction Work | Rating:
5

If you find damaged or disturbed building materials such as plaster or floor tiles, assume these materials contain potentially hazardous materials until otherwise noted and contact your UFT borough health and safety representative. Similarly, damaged or disturbed exterior caulk may contain PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls). Contact the health and safety representative at your UFT borough office.

Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Construction Work | Rating:
4.5

Yes, there must be a protocol meeting prior to the commencement of an SCA construction and renovation project and the UFT chapter leader must be present. There also must be a protocol meeting prior to the commencement of DOE Division of School Facilities (DSF) repair, renovation and/or construction work that will disturb/involve more than 100 square feet of building materials. More details about the protocols that must be followed can be found in...

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Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Construction Work | Rating:
5

The School Construction Authority (SCA) is supposed to conduct construction and renovation projects after the regular school day. The DOE Division of School Facilities (DSF) may conduct repairs and maintenance as well as small construction and renovation projects during the school day. However, asbestos abatement projects, whether conducted by the SCA or the DOE DSF, may be conducted only when the building is not occupied.

Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Bloodborne Pathogens | Rating:
5

While most New York City school educators are not at risk, if you are exposed to blood or body fluids in an accident, playground scrape, bloody nose, fight, athletic injury or violent incident, treat any such incident as if the fluids are infected because there is no way to tell if a child or adult is infected with Hepatitis B or other bloodborne pathogens.

Wash the affected area with soap and water immediately. Flush eyes and exposed mucous membranes with large amounts of water....

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Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Bloodborne Pathogens | Rating:
5

The DOE is required to develop an Exposure Control Plan that:

  • identifies at-risk workers;
  • outlines methods to prevent or eliminate exposure, including universal precautions and the use of safe needle devices;
  • outlines adequate personal protective equipment;
  • establishes a housekeeping, cleaning and disinfection program;
  • establishes a bloodborne pathogens training program;
  • offers Hepatitis B vaccine at no cost; and
  • ...
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Posted Aug 4, 2010 | Category: Bloodborne Pathogens | Rating:
3

By law, employers must take specific measures to prevent or reduce worker exposure to blood and other infectious body fluids in the workplace. It applies to all school employees considered at-risk because their job brings them into routine contact with blood and body fluids that can cause diseases such as HIV/AIDs, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C. That contact may occur while providing first aid or be the result of bites, cuts or openings in the skin, needlesticks, or splashes into the eyes,...

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