Frequently Asked Questions

Posted Mar 21, 2014 | Category: Certification and Licensing | Rating:
1

If you are a paraprofessional who has been provisionally appointed to a position for the 2013-14 school year, you must submit a certificate of completion of DASA training to the New York City Department of Education no later than August 1, 2014 to avoid termination. See this DOE memo for more information.

For all others, the deadline for completing DASA training depends on the expiration date of your certificate; you must...

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Posted Mar 21, 2014 | Category: Certification and Licensing | Rating:
0

Yes. If, for example, you are a professional certificate holder and want an additional certificate, you will need to complete DASA training for your additional certificate.

Posted Mar 21, 2014 | Category: Certification and Licensing | Rating:
0

You must complete six hours of coursework from a provider approved by the New York State Education Department. You can find a list of approved providers at the NYSED website. The UFT is an approved provider and offers this course in its borough offices; see the UFT Courses page for dates, times and registration information.

Upon completion of...

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Posted Mar 21, 2014 | Category: Certification and Licensing | Rating:
5

School professionals (teachers, paraprofessionals, counselors, psychologists and social workers) who are applying for state certification after December 31, 2013 must take this six-hour course. This includes members who are applying for new certificates (for example, paraprofessionals going from a Level 1 to a Level 2 or 3).

Members who meet the following criteria do not need to take the course: a) permanently or professionally certified; b) hired prior to 2004; c)...

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Posted Mar 21, 2014 | Category: Certification and Licensing | Rating:
0

The Dignity for All Students Act mandates that anyone applying for a New York State teaching license or certificate after December 31, 2013 complete six hours of training on harassment, bullying and discrimination in schools.

Posted Sep 27, 2013 | Category: Tenure | Rating:
3

Under New York State law, appointed teachers achieve tenure after completing a probationary period (usually three years) and fulfilling all the requirements for the professional certificate. In New York City, tenure is granted in your license appointment area. Having tenure means you may not be disciplined or terminated without due process. As a tenured teacher, you have the right to a hearing before an independent arbitrator regarding any charges brought against you. This due process right...

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Posted Sep 26, 2013 | Category: Tenure | Rating:
1

The process for determining whether or not you will get tenure is rigorous, and tenure is not automatic at the end of the probationary period. You must: 1) complete all your state certification and city licensing requirements, file an application and receive professional certification; 2) have a record of acceptable service during your probationary period; and 3) be recommended for tenure by your principal.

Posted Sep 25, 2013 | Category: Tenure | Rating:
0

The Department of Education introduced the new evaluation system for the 2013–14 school year. Rather than the “Satisfactory” or “Unsatisfactory” ratings used in previous years, the new system will evaluate teachers as: Highly Effective, Effective, Developing, or Ineffective. A probationary teacher who receives two “Ineffective” ratings in a row will be presumed to be incompetent under the new teacher evaluation system.

A ...

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Posted Aug 22, 2013 | Category: Letter in the File | Rating:
5

The “file” is your personnel file that travels with you if you change schools. Supervisors may put into it observation reports and other materials about your performance within three months of occurrence excluding the summer, but you must be given the opportunity to read it . You can attach a response if you want. Negative material that is not used in disciplinary charges should be removed after three years.
 

Posted Aug 22, 2013 | Category: Letter in the File | Rating:
3.75

You have the right to attach a response to material that is placed in your file. You do not have to attach your response right away. It is important that you take the time to carefully respond to what is written and review it with your chapter leader before submitting it. He/she can help you respond in a way that will not put you at risk. Your response should be written as objectively as you can and it should cite whatever facts support your position on the issue.

Posted Aug 22, 2013 | Category: Letter in the File | Rating:
5

Yes, your signature acknowledges that you have seen it, nothing more. It does not mean that you agree with the content of the letter.

Posted Aug 22, 2013 | Category: Letter in the File | Rating:
4.666665

Material in your file can be grieved under two specific circumstances:

  1. if the letter was written outside the contractual time frame (time limits are specified in the contract);
  2. if the underlying substance of the letter violates a specific contractual clause or Board of Education regulation.

Talk to your chapter leader.

Posted Aug 22, 2013 | Category: Letter in the File | Rating:
3.333335

No, you can and should remove all negative materials in your file that are more than three years old if they have not been used in connection with disciplinary charges. Talk to your chapter leader about how this is done in your school.

Posted Aug 22, 2013 | Category: Letter in the File | Rating:
4

A counseling memo is designed to advise you of a rule or policy. It cannot include or threaten disciplinary action, as a letter in the file can. Counseling memos can be used as part of a disciplinary process only to show that you were notified of the rule, whereas letters in the file may be used to support an unsatisfactory rating or other discipline.

Posted Jul 17, 2013 | Category: Resignation | Rating:
4.5

There is no official paperwork. You must write a letter — preferably an email because that has a date stamp — to your principal stating the day your resignation will be effective, which should be 30 calendar days from the date of your letter. For example, if you wish to resign on Sept. 4, you must send your email/letter postmarked Aug. 4. Your letter should clearly state the day that your resignation is effective. Resignations cannot be made effective during a break. Be aware that you won’t...

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