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Empower students through real-world events

We can help students develop a better understanding of both the world and their place in it by using the world around us to teach in a way that invites critical thinking, draws on multiple perspectives and reflects who we are in the 21st century.


Cameras, mics and rethinking classroom engagement

Much of what happens during remote learning is beyond our control. What is not beyond our control is our ability to think critically about what meaningful lessons look like in this landscape, what content students need at this unique moment and what philosophy shifts we can take with us to be more responsive educators when we all return to school buildings. 

Peer-led discussions are a key building block

Participating in peer-led discussions allows students to take ownership of their learning and learn the value of collaboration.

Using memoirs helps students understand the Holocaust

Lisa Berke, an English teacher at Edward R. Murrow HS in Brooklyn, teaches a course on Holocaust literature through the lens of memoir because she believes in its ability to cultivate empathy. 

Virtual learning for early childhood students

Early childhood educators face a unique challenge with remote learning. In our classrooms, learning occurs through hands-on experiences guided by an intentional facilitator. How can we recreate this virtually? 

Assessing effectiveness of remote learning

Is remote learning effective? Here are some ways to find out.

Civics amplifies students’ voices

Participating in civics gives students the ability to champion causes, organize, disseminate information and influence public opinion. And through civic experiences, they learn they have a voice.

Building discussion in your math classroom

When I became a middle school math teacher 12 years ago, one of the first things I noticed was how chatty students can be. So I was surprised when, after I asked my students to discuss a math problem, strategy or solution with their group members, the room would suddenly get quieter.

No reason to blow off STEAM

If you are an educator without any formal training or background in science, being told to teach STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics) may seem daunting. There’s the fear of the unknown, the fear of failure, the fear of not being able to tackle it all.

Importance of getting to know your students

When I began my career as a high school social studies teacher four years ago, I knew I wanted my classroom management to be dramatically different from the “reward and punishment” style.